Create a Cleaning Schedule for Your Busy Lifestyle

Written By: Heather Viera

Life is a balancing act. Between work, school commitments, sports, and music lessons a lot of things can fall by the wayside, including cleaning. If you feel like you’re always a step behind, a cleaning schedule might be the answer. The best part is you can adapt the schedule to fit your lifestyle no matter how hectic and frantic it gets. 

Make a List of Tasks

Before you can schedule anything, you need to know what has to be done. Walk through your home making a list of all the cleaning tasks. This initial list should be comprehensive. Don’t leave anything off because you only do it once a month or it seems trivial. Cleaning out the refrigerator and dusting the baseboards deserve attention too. This master list will be your reference guide when you make your cleaning schedule so it needs to be thorough. 

Create an Organization Chart

You’ve made your master list. Create a visual representation of how’d you like to spread out those tasks. You can go about this any way you want, but two popular methods are a checklist or a calendar. With the checklist method, you create a daily or weekly checklist with each day’s tasks. As you and your family complete them, check them off the list. It’s pretty simple but requires that you frequently print new lists. 

With the calendar method, you create a weekly or monthly calendar and assign cleaning tasks to certain days. This method makes it easier to compare your cleaning schedule to your family’s activity schedule. You can also combine the two and print a weekly calendar with a checklist for each day. 

Arrange the Cleaning Schedule

You’ve decided on your organization method. Now on to organizing it. Take the tasks on your master list and divide them into daily, monthly, and weekly lists. Here’s where you get the freedom to fit the cleaning schedule to your lifestyle. Compare your list of master tasks with your family’s activity schedule. 

Look for open blocks of time where you can get to the bigger jobs like mopping floors and cleaning bathrooms. Start filling in the chart. You can put fewer tasks on your busy days and more tasks on the down days. Weekends maybe your big cleaning days or it could be a couple of afternoons when everyone happens to be home.  

You have the freedom to move tasks around week by week as different activities come up or your children’s activity schedule changes. 

Involve Everyone

When making your schedule, involve the entire family. Chores teach responsibility and build family unity. Children also learn how to care for their own possessions. Who knows, they may even be less likely to make a mess if they’re the ones who have to clean it up. 
Make sure you have the right tools for everyone to participate. Children can use a lightweight or hand vacuum easier than a full-size model. Dust cloths on a rod make it easier for children to reach high places. Sanitizing wipes make quick work of cleaning door handles and light switches. 

Conclusion

A cleaning schedule need not be set in stone. You can adjust your organization method, the tasks, and who completes them based on changing needs. But a cleaning schedule gives you peace of mind knowing that the work will get done. It takes some of the burdens off your shoulders so you can focus on spending time with your family. 

Life is a balancing act. Between work, school commitments, sports, and music lessons, a lot of things can fall by the wayside, including cleaning. If you feel like you’re always a step behind, a cleaning schedule might be the answer. The best part is you can adapt the schedule to fit your lifestyle no matter how hectic and frantic it gets. 

Make a List of Tasks

Before you can schedule anything, you need to know what has to be done. Walkthrough your home making a list of all the cleaning tasks. This initial list should be comprehensive. Don’t leave anything off because you only do it once a month, or it seems trivial. Cleaning out the refrigerator and dusting the baseboards deserve attention too. This master list will be your reference guide when you make your cleaning schedule, so it needs to be thorough. 

Create an Organization Chart

You’ve made your master list. Create a visual representation of how’d you like to spread out those tasks. You can go about this any way you want, but two popular methods are a checklist or a calendar. With the checklist method, you create a daily or weekly checklist with each day’s tasks. As you and your family complete them, check them off the list. It’s pretty simple but requires that you frequently print new lists. 

With the calendar method, you create a weekly or monthly calendar and assign cleaning tasks to certain days. This method makes it easier to compare your cleaning schedule to your family’s activity schedule. You can also combine the two and print a weekly calendar with a checklist for each day. 

Arrange the Cleaning Schedule

You’ve decided on your organization method. Now on to organizing it. Take the tasks on your master list and divide them into daily, monthly, and weekly lists. Here’s where you get the freedom to fit the cleaning schedule to your lifestyle. Compare your list of master tasks with your family’s activity schedule. 

Look for open blocks of time where you can get to the bigger jobs like mopping floors and cleaning bathrooms. Start filling in the chart. You can put fewer tasks on your busy days and more tasks on the down days. Weekends may be your big cleaning days, or it could be a couple of afternoons when everyone happens to be home.  

You have the freedom to move tasks around week by week as different activities come up or your children’s activity schedule changes. 

Involve Everyone

When making your schedule, involve the entire family. Chores teach responsibility and build family unity. Children also learn how to care for their own possessions. Who knows, they may even be less likely to make a mess if they’re the ones who have to clean it up. 

Make sure you have the right tools for everyone to participate. Children can use a lightweight or hand vacuum easier than a full-size model. Dust cloths on a rod make it easier for children to reach high places. Sanitizing wipes make quick work of cleaning door handles and light switches. 

Conclusion

A cleaning schedule need not be set in stone. You can adjust your organization method, the tasks, and who completes them based on changing needs. But a cleaning schedule gives you peace of mind knowing that the work will get done. It takes some of the burdens off your shoulders so you can focus on spending time with your family. 

Heather Viera is a lifestyle expert and researcher for FamilyLivingToday.com. She is dedicated to achieving a balanced lifestyle, even with two small children and a full-time career. In the little free time, she has, she enjoys hiking with her partner and taking her dog to the beach.